If you've already fallen behind on your monthly payments or can no longer afford your minimum payments, we want to talk to you. If can't see any way to improve your financial situation without taking a drastic step like declaring bankruptcy, we may be able to help. What's more, we have years of experience with clients who face exacerbating circumstances like divorce, death in the family, unemployment, long-term medical issues and other problems.

The key to debt consolidation is to avoid taking on new debt. If you borrow money, pay off your credit cards and then charge them back up again, you’re in worse shape than ever. If there is any chance that you might do this, or if you find yourself doing it after you obtain the consolidation loan, stop using the cards and just close the accounts. Your credit score will suffer, but your finances will thrive. Your score will come back up over time, and by then you’ll have learned valuable lessons about racking up too much debt.


Ideally, you will use a financial product with a lower interest rate to pay off debts charging a higher rate. The reduction in interest will help you save money you would have been required to pay had you not consolidated your debts. It also saves money on late fees, missed payment penalties and other consequences you may face when you have a difficult time managing debt. Depending on the size of your debt and the difference between the two interest rates, your savings may be worth thousands of dollars.
We don’t necessarily admire the additional fee structures (it’s 2019, we need companies to clearly price their services) for the “Fast Track” and “Identity Optimization” services, one-time fees of $25 each. However, the Fast Track option can be useful if you’re looking to apply for a loan very soon, so the extra fee may-well be justified on a case-by-case basis.

If you’ve been looking at consolidating your debt, but you think there are some other great options available to you, you might be wondering what the best choice is. While there are plenty of ways you can reduce the amount of interest you’re currently paying, many of them come with downsides that are hard to foresee. Regardless, you might find that one of these options is more suited to you.

A variable-rate loan has an interest rate that changes over time. They are typically tied to the U.S. prime rate, which is a foundation rate for loan products used by American lenders. With a variable-rate loan, you may have a lower starting interest rate, but your rate and payment amount can change over time when there are changes to the U.S. prime rate. Some variable-rate loans have a cap, which puts a limit on the maximum interest rate. Variable-rate loans often have lower starting interest rates, although that is not always the case.


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Before you apply, we encourage you to carefully consider whether consolidating your existing debt is the right choice for you. Consolidating multiple loans means you'll have a single payment each month for that combined debt but it may not reduce or pay your debt off sooner. By understanding how consolidating your debt benefits you, you'll be in a better position to decide if it is the right option for you.
Lender preapprovals can help you identify the best loan offering, comparing rates and terms from lenders who are willing to extend you credit. But 59 percent of respondents didn’t get a preapproval from more than one lender, and of those, 37 percent didn’t get any preapprovals at all. Just over 40 percent of respondents got preapprovals from more than one lender, including 18 percent who obtained preapprovals from more than four lenders.
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