Debt consolidation loans are a well-known, well-advertised option for consumers who struggle with debt. These credit facilities exist for the express purpose of paying off outstanding unsecured debts and do their job quite well. When you take out a debt consolidation loan, your lender immediately pays off your existing creditors and starts billing you for the balance.
For most respondents, a debt consolidation loan was a good choice. Twenty-eight percent were able to lower monthly payments using their debt consolidation loan, 27 percent lowered or eliminated debt and 9 percent improved their credit score. But debt consolidation loans weren’t a good choice for all respondents, as 9 percent accrued more debt, 5 percent paid more interest overall and 2 percent lost their collateral.
Become familiar with the information contained in each of your credit reports. They'll all look very similar, even if you've ordered them from different bureaus. Each credit report contains your personal identifying information, detailed history for each of your accounts, any items that have been listed in public record like a bankruptcy, and the inquiries that have been made to your credit report.

Debt settlement companies often charge expensive fees and may charge fees for using third party-dedicated bank accounts for debt payments. They may encourage you to stop paying your credit card bills so that creditors will negotiate with them. This is a bad idea, as it will result in late fees, penalty interest and other charges that will make your debt grow larger. When you stop making payments, your creditors are likely to step up collection efforts and may file a debt collection lawsuit against you.
For most respondents, a debt consolidation loan was a good choice. Twenty-eight percent were able to lower monthly payments using their debt consolidation loan, 27 percent lowered or eliminated debt and 9 percent improved their credit score. But debt consolidation loans weren’t a good choice for all respondents, as 9 percent accrued more debt, 5 percent paid more interest overall and 2 percent lost their collateral.
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