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Rather than trying to settle your debts yourself, which can be very difficult and time-consuming a better option would be to hire National Debt Relief. We have already helped more than 100,000 families and individuals achieve freedom from their debts since the company was founded in 2008. We have achieved this by helping pay off more than $1 billion in unsecured debts.
Unfortunately I am not finding stepchange very helpful. I am on the other side, a tenant who owes me... £2,000, but has cost me an overall loss of over £3500 and resulted in me having to sell my old home. I feel like every time I speak to stepchange I am the person that owes the money, not the one that has gone through a horrific time losing the money. He has defaulted on his payments to me via stepchange and I have no protection on this whatsoever. It’s all about protecting the other person. He won’t give me his address and this in itself causes problems. He set me up on the re payment plans and then they won’t discuss anything with me. I think it is being sorted, but I just don’t understand how a charity works likes this. Unbelievably stressful situation ! See More
The Servicemembers Civil Relief Act passed in 2003 offers financial assistance and protection to active-duty service members. This act was passed to give service members the ability to focus on their job without concern for serious financial consequences. However, the benefits only apply during active duty, and there are some exceptions. SCRA benefits include:

Imagine you had $5,000 worth of credit card debt with an APR of about 25%. Over 36 months, the monthly payment on the debt would be approximately $240 and you would pay a total of $2,500 in total interest. If you were to consolidate this debt into a new loan with an average APR of 17% over 36 months, the total amount you pay toward interest would drop to around $1,700 and your monthly payment would come down to $200. In this scenario, the lower the APR on your new loan, the less you will pay toward interest over time.

Before you consider applying for a loan, one option is to use a debt management plan to consolidate your monthly debt payments. With a plan like this, you must first find a credit counselor and work with them to formulate and stick to a repayment plan. Once you and your counselor agree on a plan, they will often try to negotiate with your creditors to see if they can get you a lower monthly payment and sometimes a lower interest rate.

The months and years that follow can make the larger difference to your credit score, but only if you don’t rack up more debt as you pay off the consolidated debt. As you focus on paying down the loan, each on-time payment will be recorded and reported to the credit reporting bureaus and the positive activity will help to strengthen your credit score over time. To put the impact into perspective, your on-time payment history accounts for about 35% of your FICO credit score.

If you are in a situation where debt consolidation isn't a good fit, there are other options. In some cases, debt settlement - such as the services offered here at National Debt Relief - may work better for you. In other cases, working with a credit counselor to develop a plan to address your debts may be a good choice. If your current financial situation is so dire that you may never be able to make even minimum payments to service your debts, bankruptcy may be the only option. In any case, before you decide on debt consolidation or some other method to address your outstanding debts, you should talk to a trusted financial advisor to determine the best path forward.
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Consolidating your debt into a new, lower-interest loan — a balance transfer credit card, personal loan or home equity loan — may hurt your credit scores in the short- or medium term. But if you make regular, on-time payments on that consolidation loan and pay it off in a reasonable amount of time, your credit scores should recover and may even improve over the long run as you get rid of debt faster and establish a sound payment history.
Debt settlement companies also charge a fee for their "service." Most of the time, settlement fees cost between $1,500 to $3,500. Fraudulent debt settlement companies often tell customers to stop making payments on their debts and instead pay the company. Once their fee is accounted for, they promise to negotiate with your creditors and settle your debts. Sounds great, right? Well, the debt settlement companies usually don’t deliver on helping you with your debt after they take your money. They’ll leave you on the hook for late fees and additional interest payments on debt they promised to help you pay!
When improving your credit, it’s important to consider the types of accounts you will open as they reflect strongly upon your credit. Before you run to open a new account, ensure that you are financially able to pay for anything you borrow. A variety of accounts will not help your credit score if you have missed payments or high credit utilization as a result. Below you’ll learn more about about this

Payday loans are a growing problem in the United States – people use them as a form of finance when they have nowhere else to turn. The problem with payday loans is that they often have interest rates and fees that make the loans unaffordable over the long-term. If you’ve managed to grow a large amount of debt through payday loans, you might want to consider a consolidation loan.
In some cases, it might be difficult to determine what to include as far as supporting documentation goes — that’s another way a credit repair company can help you. For example, if you’re a victim of identity theft and a fraudulent account is appearing on your credit report, it can be tough to prove it isn’t yours since you naturally don’t have any documents relating to the account.
This is easier said than done, but reducing the amount that you owe is going to be a far more satisfying achievement than improving your credit score. The first thing you need to do is stop using your credit cards. Use your credit report to make a list of all of your accounts and then go online or check recent statements to determine how much you owe on each account and what interest rate they are charging you. Come up with a payment plan that puts most of your available budget for debt payments towards the highest interest cards first, while maintaining minimum payments on your other accounts.
Making your credit payments on time is one of the biggest contributing factors to your credit scores. Some banks offer payment reminders through their online banking portals that can send you an email or text message reminding you when a payment is due. You could also consider enrolling in automatic payments through your credit card and loan providers to have payments automatically debited from your bank account, but this only makes the minimum payment on your credit cards and does not help instill a sense of money management.
Your credit history will significantly influence the interest rate quoted for your debt consolidation loan, as most lenders use risk-based pricing. With very good or excellent credit (a FICO credit score of 740 or higher), you will be in a better position to qualify for the lowest interest rate offered by a lender. With a lower credit score, you are a higher risk and will be offered a higher interest rate.
If you have a poor credit rating, it can be difficult to get a debt consolidation loan. If your credit rating is too low, you may have to first take proactive steps to improve it, and then apply for a debt consolidation loan afterward. In addition, people with less-than-stellar credit can sometimes get a secured debt consolidation loan using a major asset as collateral. For example, people often use their homes as collateral to consolidate their debts with a home equity line of credit. However, if your credit is particularly bad, even a secured debt consolidation loan may be difficult to obtain. In that case, you'll likely have to consider other options to address your outstanding debts.
Just under 30 percent of respondents obtained a debt consolidation loan to lose wer their interest rate and manage the challenge of accumulating interest charges. But consolidating into a single monthly payment was the most popular motivation for getting a debt consolidation loan, with 35 percent of respondents indicating that was why they chose to get their loan. Thirty-two percent of respondents obtained a debt consolidation loan for a lower monthly payment.
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