We are almost always able to negotiate better settlements than can individuals on their own because of our experience and expertise. We charge no upfront fees and, in fact, charge nothing until we have settled all of your debts to your satisfaction. When you agree to work with us, you will begin sending National Debt Relief an agreed-upon amount each month, which is deposited in an escrow account that only you can control. Once enough money has accumulated in your account, we then begin negotiations with your creditors.

This tool is for illustrative and educational purposes only and assumes excellent borrower credit history. Your Annual Percentage Rate (APR) will be based on the specific characteristics of your credit application including, but not limited to, evaluation of credit history and amount of credit requested. Your actual APR will be determined when a credit decision is made and may be higher than the rates shown. At least 5% of approved applicants qualified for this rate based on data from 07/01/2018 to 09/30/2018. The interest rate is fixed for the life of the loan. Rates subject to change without notice.
The American Opportunity Tax Credit has been improved by the Tax Cuts & Job Act.  This is one of the more popular deductions for student loans that allows up to a $2,500 deduction for qualified education expenses for the first 4 years of higher education. The IRS data show that 9m Americans applied for this tax credit last year.  The Tax Cuts & Jobs Act has increased the allowable deduction period to five years instead of four, but the fifth year is at a reduced $1,250 deduction.  The deduction is calculated as being 100% of the expenses incurred up to the first $2,000, and after that it’s 25% of the next $2,000 for a max of $2,500.
Debt settlement companies also charge a fee for their "service." Most of the time, settlement fees cost between $1,500 to $3,500. Fraudulent debt settlement companies often tell customers to stop making payments on their debts and instead pay the company. Once their fee is accounted for, they promise to negotiate with your creditors and settle your debts. Sounds great, right? Well, the debt settlement companies usually don’t deliver on helping you with your debt after they take your money. They’ll leave you on the hook for late fees and additional interest payments on debt they promised to help you pay!
If you don’t address the exact cause of your bad credit, the damage is likely to worsen the longer it goes untreated. For example, if you’ve missed a few credit-card payments, repaying at least the minimum amount needed to change your account’s status from “delinquent” to “paid” on your credit reports will prevent your score from falling further. The same is true of collections accounts, tax liens and other derogatory marks — at least to a certain extent.
You likely don’t need to wait for Trump to lower your payment, you may be able to lower your payment today. Look at Income-Driven Repayment programs and/or private loan consolidations today. Based on his statements so far it is likely he will continue the Income-Driven Repayment program that helps borrowers lower their payment to a manageable size.
Bankruptcy will damage your credit and may remain on your credit report for up to 10 years. It is nearly impossible to get a mortgage after declaring bankruptcy. You will lose all of your credit cards, some or all of your luxury possessions and any property that is not exempt from sale. Bankruptcy does not relieve student debt or eliminate obligations to pay alimony or child support.
Step 2: Tell the creditor or other information provider, in writing, that you dispute an item. Include copies (NOT originals) of documents that support your position. Many providers specify an address for disputes. If the provider reports the item to a consumer reporting company, it must include a notice of your dispute. And if the information is found to be inaccurate, the provider may not report it again.
A second way to get debt under control and ultimately paid off is with a debt consolidation loan. If you own your home and have some equity in it you might be able to get either a home equity loan or a homeowner equity line of credit (HELOC). You would then use the proceeds from the loan to pay off all of your other debts. You would then have only one payment to make a month, which should be considerably less than the sum of the payments you are now making. The reason for this is that either one of these loans would have a much lower interest rate than the average of the interest rates you’re now paying. If you’re paying an average of 15% or even higher on your credit card debts and were able to consolidate them into a variable rate home equity loan, your interest rate could drop to 4% or less. And the interest on an interest-only HELOC might be even lower.
“A good credit repair company will scrub questionable credit report items against other laws — like the Fair Credit Billing Act, which regulates original creditors; the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, which oversees collection agencies; and others that address medical illness, military service, student status and other life events,” Padawer said.
5. Make a plan to avoid new debt. A debt consolidation loan can wipe the slate clean and allow you to start fresh with zero balances on credit cards and other credit commitments. Although it may be tempting, avoid using your newly cleared accounts to shop or manage household expenses. You don’t want to create new debt that you’ll have to pay on top of your debt consolidation loan.

After getting a debt consolidation loan, 68 percent of respondents changed their spending habits for the better. More than 30 percent said they now pay bills on time, 22 percent monitor their credit reports and 13 percent stopped using consolidated accounts. However, not all respondents changed their habits for the better, with 10 percent reporting they accrued more debt, which is in line with the 9 percent who said they also accrued more debt when asked if the loan was a good choice. Seven percent maxed out credit lines and 7 percent made charges on consolidated accounts.
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