A credit card could very well be the source of your credit-score sorrow. But it’s also your score’s best chance at recovery. You can’t remove negative records that are accurate from your credit reports. So the best you can hope for is to devalue them with a steady flow of positive information. And credit cards are perfect for the job because anyone can get them, they can be free to use, and they don’t force you to go into debt. Plus, they report information to the major credit bureaus on a monthly basis.
“Working with my local branch I gave them my ‘wish list” of debt consolidation items and credit issues that I needed to get taken care of to increase my credit score and reduce my monthly financial debt. I did not want a long loan or to have to pay a lot in interest. Not only did they get me my ’wish list” they were able to offer me a reduced length payment plan that took off 1/3 of the interest. Fabulous customer service, quick response, understanding and very friendly. I know I can count on One Main Financial for my future. Thank you!!!”3
The second way to pay down credit card debt is called the debt snowball method. The financial wizard Dave Ramsey developed it. If you were to choose this method you would put your credit card debts in order from the one with the lowest balance down to the one with the highest and then put all of your efforts against paying off the one with the lowest balance.
SoFi Personal Loans are not available to residents of MS. Maximum interest rate on loans for residents of AK and WY is 9.99% APR, for residents of IL with loans over $40,000 is 8.99% APR, for residents of TX is 9.99% APR on terms greater than 5 years, for residents of CO, CT, HI, VA, SC is 11.99% APR, and for residents of ME is 12.24% APR. Personal loans not available to residents of MI who already have a student loan with SoFi. Personal Loans minimum loan amount is $5,000. Residents of AZ, MA, and NH have a minimum loan amount of $10,001. Residents of KY have a minimum loan amount of $15,001. Residents of PA have a minimum loan amount of $25,001. Variable rates not available to residents of AK, TX, VA, WY, or for residents of IL for loans greater than $40,000.
Once you’ve done your best to mitigate and lessen any previous negative factors on your credit report, it’s important to start building some positive credit history right away. Perhaps you’ve been denied a credit card or a certain type of credit in the past. Fortunately, this doesn’t mean that you’re entirely shut out from borrowing and building credit. Consider a secured credit card, which will require a deposit that becomes your credit limit. If you fail to make payments, the company can then withdraw the funds from your account automatically. Lenders are much more lenient extending this type of credit, and it can be a fantastic way to start the credit repair process.
Scoring models consider how much you owe and across how many different accounts. If you have debt across a large number of accounts, it may be beneficial to pay off some of the accounts, if you can. Paying down your debt is the goal of many who've accrued debt in the past, but even after you pay the balance down to zero, consider keeping that account open. Keeping paid-off accounts open can be a plus in your overall credit mix since they're aged accounts in good (paid-off) standing. You may also consider debt consolidation.
Will your debt consolidation loan diversify your “debt portfolio?” If so, then just taking out a debt consolidation loan may give your credit score a slight boost. One of the five factors used to determine your credit score is credit mix, a measurement of the different types of debt you’re currently holding. Lenders like to see that borrowers can qualify for and manage different types of debt. If your previous debts have been limited to credit card accounts, getting a debt consolidation loan may help to raise your credit score a little. However, the key word here is “little,” because credit mix only accounts for about 10% of your overall credit score.
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After getting a debt consolidation loan, 68 percent of respondents changed their spending habits for the better. More than 30 percent said they now pay bills on time, 22 percent monitor their credit reports and 13 percent stopped using consolidated accounts. However, not all respondents changed their habits for the better, with 10 percent reporting they accrued more debt, which is in line with the 9 percent who said they also accrued more debt when asked if the loan was a good choice. Seven percent maxed out credit lines and 7 percent made charges on consolidated accounts.
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