If you've already fallen behind on your monthly payments or can no longer afford your minimum payments, we want to talk to you. If can't see any way to improve your financial situation without taking a drastic step like declaring bankruptcy, we may be able to help. What's more, we have years of experience with clients who face exacerbating circumstances like divorce, death in the family, unemployment, long-term medical issues and other problems.
You will use your own personal credit history and information, so the debt will be on your credit, not the business. Using your credit history can be helpful in qualifying for the loan, as you may have a stronger credit history than your business. However, it puts your personal finances at risk, so a small business debt consolidation loan isn’t the right choice for every business owner.

Getting a loan to consolidate our bills was crazy easy. We checked reviews before moving forward and everyone said great things. We tried it and sure enough we were approved in a day and had the funds in our account the next day!!! It was so simple and now we are paying off this debt even faster than before because of the low interest rate. Highly recommended!


If you don’t address the exact cause of your bad credit, the damage is likely to worsen the longer it goes untreated. For example, if you’ve missed a few credit-card payments, repaying at least the minimum amount needed to change your account’s status from “delinquent” to “paid” on your credit reports will prevent your score from falling further. The same is true of collections accounts, tax liens and other derogatory marks — at least to a certain extent.
Your credit history will significantly influence the interest rate quoted for your debt consolidation loan, as most lenders use risk-based pricing. With very good or excellent credit (a FICO credit score of 740 or higher), you will be in a better position to qualify for the lowest interest rate offered by a lender. With a lower credit score, you are a higher risk and will be offered a higher interest rate.
All loans available through FreedomPlus.com are made by Cross River Bank, a New Jersey State Chartered Commercial Bank, Member FDIC, Equal Housing Lender. All loan and rate terms are subject to eligibility restrictions, application review, credit score, loan amount, loan term, lender approval, and credit usage and history. Eligibility for a loan is not guaranteed. Loans are not available to residents of all states - please call a FreedomPlus representative for further details. The following limitations, in addition to others, shall apply: FreedomPlus does not arrange loans in: (i) Arizona under $10,500; (ii) Massachusetts under $6,500, (iii) Ohio under $5,500, and (iv) Georgia under $3,500. Repayment periods range from 24 to 60 months. The range of APRs on loans made available through FreedomPlus is 5.99% to a maximum of 29.99% APR. The APR calculation includes all applicable fees, including the loan origination fee. For Example, a four year $20,000 loan with an interest rate of 15.49% and corresponding APR of 18.34% would have an estimated monthly payment of $561.60 and a total cost payable of $7,948.13. To qualify for a 5.99% APR loan, a borrower will need excellent credit on a loan for an amount less than $12,000.00, and with a term equal to 24 months. Adding a co-borrower with sufficient income; using at least eighty-five percent (85%) of the loan proceeds to directly pay off qualifying existing debt; or showing proof of sufficient retirement savings, could help you also qualify for the lowest rate available.
Some debt relief companies and lenders offer to consolidate federal and private loans together into one new loan to lower your monthly payments or interest rate. Don’t do it. Consolidating private and federal loans turns it into a private loan, which means you will lose the federal repayment benefits and protections of your federal loans, such as deferment and forbearance, income-based repayment plans, and loan forgiveness. 
While many people focus on the interest rates associated with loans, there are other things to keep in mind as well. If you want to make sure that you get the best deal, you also need to think of fees. Many loan companies try to hide the true cost of their loans by adding in fees at the end of the process. Always make sure that you check the terms of the loans to make sure that there aren’t any hidden fees.
Each time you apply for credit is listed on your credit report as a “hard inquiry” and if you have too many within two years, your credit score will suffer. In general, a consumer with good credit can apply for credit a few times each year before it begins to affect their credit score. If you’re already starting with below-average credit, however, these inquiries may have more of an impact on your score and delay your ultimate goal of watching your credit score climb.

Lenders and others usually use your credit report along with additional finance factors to make decisions about the risks they face in lending to you. Having negative information on your credit report or a low credit score could suggest to lenders that you are less likely to pay back your debt as agreed. As a result, they may deny you a loan or charge you higher rates and fees.


Credit cards can be easy to get into trouble with because after you make a payment, unless you’re maxed out, you can use your credit card again. Low interest credit cards are no exception. Before you apply for a low rate credit card to consolidate other debts, make a free, confidential appointment with one of our Credit Counsellors and look at other debt consolidation options. To learn more about consolidating debt with credit cards, click here.
Credit cards with zero percent APR balance transfer introductory offers allow you to transfer existing debt at a zero percent APR for a certain period of time, usually 12 to 21 months. They typically allow credit card debt transfers, but some allow transfers of other types of debt. With a zero percent APR balance transfer offer, you will get time to pay down or pay off your debt without accumulating any new interest.
Bill “No Pay” Fay has lived a meager financial existence his entire life. He started writing/bragging about it seven years ago, helping birth Debt.org into existence as the site’s original “Frugal Man.” Prior to that, he spent more than 30 years covering college and professional sports, which are the fantasy worlds of finance. His work has been published by the Associated Press, New York Times, Washington Post, Chicago Tribune, Sports Illustrated and Sporting News, among others. His interest in sports has waned some, but his interest in never reaching for his wallet is as passionate as ever. Bill can be reached at bfay@debt.org.
While the Internet can be a wonderful thing it is also the home of some real scoundrels. As an example of this there was until just a few years ago a number of very dishonest debt settlement companies online. They made grandiose promises, collected big upfront fees, closed up without providing any services and then reopened a few months later under different names. While the Federal Trade Commission cracked down on many of these fly-by-night operations there are some still lurking out there.

A Personal Loan can offer funds relatively quickly once you qualify you could have your funds within a few days to a week. A loan can be fixed for a term and rate or variable with fluctuating amount due and rate assessed, be sure to speak with your loan officer about the actual term and rate you may qualify for based on your credit history and ability to repay the loan. A personal loan can assist in paying off high-interest rate balances with one fixed term payment, so it is important that you try to obtain a fixed term and rate if your goal is to reduce your debt. Some lenders may require that you have an account with them already and for a prescribed period of time in order to qualify for better rates on their personal loan products. Lenders may charge an origination fee generally around 1% of the amount sought. Be sure to ask about all fees, costs and terms associated with each loan product. Loan amounts of $1,000 up to $50,000 are available through participating lenders; however, your state, credit history, credit score, personal financial situation, and lender underwriting criteria can impact the amount, fees, terms and rates offered. Ask your loan officer for details.
Through research and clinical education, universities already play an important role. But as participation in higher education has expanded, national trends in mental ill-health among young people have materialised in student populations, and there are sharp increases in demand for support services. The focus has turned to how universities look after their own communities of students and staff, to support them through mental health difficulties and help them to thrive and succeed.
Some debt relief companies and lenders offer to consolidate federal and private loans together into one new loan to lower your monthly payments or interest rate. Don’t do it. Consolidating private and federal loans turns it into a private loan, which means you will lose the federal repayment benefits and protections of your federal loans, such as deferment and forbearance, income-based repayment plans, and loan forgiveness. 
Now that you’ve learned some of the steps to repairing your credit, let’s take a look at how long it can take for this process to work. Each individual is different, and therefore each individual credit score is as well. What works for one may not work for another, but using general lessons as guidelines, everyone can see an increase in their credit score. The chart below shows the average length it takes to increase credit scores by doing a variety of things. The average time it takes to go from poor credit to fair credit is roughly 65 days.
Lenders and others usually use your credit report along with additional finance factors to make decisions about the risks they face in lending to you. Having negative information on your credit report or a low credit score could suggest to lenders that you are less likely to pay back your debt as agreed. As a result, they may deny you a loan or charge you higher rates and fees.
As well as providing advice, the organisation also campaigns for change to reduce the incidence of problem debt, and successfully worked with other charities to influence the Government to introduce a statutory a “Breathing Space” debt respite scheme.[15] Other campaigning work on overdrafts, credit cards, and high cost credit[16] has resulted in policy changes from the Financial Conduct Authority, and the charity continues to press for the reform of bailiff legislation.

The next option is to ignore your debt. Collection accounts fall off your credit report after seven years. At that point, the delinquency stops affecting your credit. The catch? Your credit suffers tremendously in the meantime, and since you’re still legally obligated to pay the debt, a debt collector can pursue you until the statute of limitations runs out in the state where you live.

Barring any unforeseen circumstances, such as borrower default or payment extensions/modifications, for example: 3-year payment plans may have a minimum repayment period of zero months and a maximum of 36 months and 5-year payment plans may have a minimum repayment period of zero months and a maximum of 60 months. Borrowers should refer to their loan agreement for specific terms and conditions. A loan example: a 5–year $10,000 loan with 9.99% APR has 60 scheduled monthly payments of $201.81, and a 3–year $5,000 loan with 5.99% APR has 36 scheduled monthly payments of $150.57. Your verifiable income must support your ability to repay your loan. Upon loan funding, the timing of available funds may vary depending upon your bank’s policies.
If you have missed payments, get current and stay current: the longer you pay your bills on time after being late, the more your FICO Scores should increase. Older credit problems count for less, so poor credit performance won't haunt you forever. The impact of past credit problems on your FICO Scores fades as time passes and as recent good payment patterns show up on your credit report. And good FICO Scores weigh any credit problems against the positive information that says you're managing your credit well.
Of course, if keeping accounts open and having credit available could trigger additional spending and debt, it might be more beneficial to close the accounts. Only you know all the ins and outs of your financial situation, and like thumbprints, they're different for each person. Make sure you carefully evaluate your situation; only you know what can work best for your financial outlook.
A lender’s maximum debt-to-income ratio is the amount of your monthly debt payments divided by your gross monthly income. Lenders use this figure to determine your ability to make loan payments each month. Some debt consolidation lenders allow a debt-to-income ratio as high as 50 percent, meaning your monthly debt obligations should add up to 50 percent or less of your gross monthly income. Others recommend little revolving credit.
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