Debt consolidation loans were a good choice for more than 60 percent of respondents, who indicated their loan helped them lower monthly payments, improve their credit score, or lower or eliminate debt. However, 58 percent of respondents spent two hours or less researching debt consolidation loans and 59 percent of respondents didn’t compare preapprovals from two or more lenders.
We agree that it is very important for individuals to be knowledgeable of their credit standing. When you have a credit-monitoring tool like freecreditscore.com on your side, you get e-mail alerts whenever there’s a change in your credit score–and you can also see your credit score whenever you want. With the free credit report from the government, you only see your report once a year. If you monitor your credit score regularly, it’s easier to catch inaccuracies before it’s too late.

The main thing that you should also be looking at is consumer watchdog sites. No matter how good you think a lender may be, it’s always important to make sure that you have a look at their customer service record. A lender might have great rates and fees, but they’re not worth working with if they have a long history of disappointing their customers. Also, checking these watchdog sites can help you tell if a company is acting fraudulently.
Consumers who have not put in the hard work and discipline to pay off their debt are at risk of repeating the same mistakes and ending up with an even bigger debt problem. In reality, debt consolidation loans only shift the debt into another form. Although it may be at a lower interest rate and have a lower payment, it is still going to take a long time to resolve.
If you are struggling to make the minimum payments on more than one account, debt consolidation may be able to give you some breathing room. If your various accounts all have harsh interest rates associated with them, it's very possible that a new debt consolidation loan can offer a more attractive rate that's less aggressive. Consult with an expert before committing to debt consolidation!
Its current Chair is John Griffith-Jones [5], replacing Sir Hector Sants in January 2019. The Chief Executive of the charity is Phil Andrew, who took over from Mike O'Connor in November 2017.[6]. In 2018 the charity embarked on an ambitious four-year plan to double the number of people it helps and to develop new services. These changes come in light of the Wyman review of debt advice funding.[7]

This tool is for illustrative and educational purposes only and assumes excellent borrower credit history. Your Annual Percentage Rate (APR) will be based on the specific characteristics of your credit application including, but not limited to, evaluation of credit history and amount of credit requested. Your actual APR will be determined when a credit decision is made and may be higher than the rates shown. At least 5% of approved applicants qualified for this rate based on data from 07/01/2018 to 09/30/2018. The interest rate is fixed for the life of the loan. Rates subject to change without notice.


Home equity loan or line of credit – With a home equity loan or home equity line of credit, homeowners who’ve built up an ownership stake in their home may be able to take out a loan using their home as collateral. These loans typically offer lower interest rates than credit cards or personal loans. But beware: If you don’t pay it back, you could lose your home.

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Annual percentage rates, terms of loan and monthly payments presented are estimated and were created based on analysis of information provided by the consumer and available rate information from lenders. While efforts have been made to maintain accurate information, the loan information is presented without warranty and the estimated APR or other terms presented do not bind any lender. Lenders generally have a range of available APRs. Your actual APR will depend upon factors evaluated at the time of application, which may include credit score, loan amount, loan term, credit usage and history. All loans are subject to credit review and approval. When evaluating offers, please review the lender's Terms and Conditions for additional details.
Lower monthly payment: A debt consolidation loan can help you avoid missed payments and defaulting on issuer agreements, even if you need to choose a longer term length. With a debt consolidation loan that lowers your monthly payments, but not your interest, you will pay more in total but have payments that are easier to handle. That way, you’re less likely to be subject to additional fees and penalty APRs that come with missing a payment.
After getting a debt consolidation loan, 68 percent of respondents changed their spending habits for the better. More than 30 percent said they now pay bills on time, 22 percent monitor their credit reports and 13 percent stopped using consolidated accounts. However, not all respondents changed their habits for the better, with 10 percent reporting they accrued more debt, which is in line with the 9 percent who said they also accrued more debt when asked if the loan was a good choice. Seven percent maxed out credit lines and 7 percent made charges on consolidated accounts.
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