If you have multiple unsecured loans that you would like to swap for a single monthly payment or if your current loan's interest rate is too high, you may benefit from taking out a Debt Consolidation Personal Loan with Rocket Loans. Debt consolidation gives you the opportunity to potentially save hundreds of dollars with a lower interest rate and can make payments more convenient for you-- with a single, automated monthly payment.
Peer-to-peer marketplace lenders, such as LendingClub, Prosper (a lending partner), Upstart and Peerform, connect individuals with money to lend with applicants who need a loan. They typically offer more flexible lending options and have lower requirements for approval. Often, they have some of the lowest starting APRs available. However, they also have some of the highest APRs.
If your debt feels overwhelming, it may be valuable to seek out the services of a reputable credit counseling service. Many are non-profit and charge small or no fees for their services. You can review more information on selecting the right reputable credit counselor for you from the National Foundation for Credit Counseling. Credit counselors can help you develop a Debt Management Plan (or DMP) and can negotiate to reduce your monthly payments. In many cases, you'll be responsible for only one monthly payment to the credit counseling service, which will then disburse funds to all of the accounts you owe on.
The Credit Repair Organizations Act, or CROA, makes it illegal for credit repair companies to lie about their services and results, and sets some additional rules. If you think you might be the victim of a credit repair scam, or if you’ve had other issues with a credit repair company, you can submit a complaint to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.
If the balances on your credit cards had been high – over 30% of the maximum credit balance – paying them off with a debt consolidation loan can be quite beneficial. While not a hard and fast rule, utilizing more than 30% of your available credit on a credit card account is generally the point at which your credit card use will start to hurt your credit score. Therefore, paying those card balances off with a debt consolidation loan should be a big help to your overall rating.

Each of the nationwide credit reporting companies — Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion — is required to provide you with a free copy of your credit report once every 12 months, if you ask for it. To order, visit annualcreditreport.com, or call 1-877-322-8228. You may order reports from each of the three credit reporting companies at the same time, or you can stagger your requests throughout the year.

If you’re using a zero percent APR balance transfer offer to pay down balances, you should avoid making new charges on the card. Doing so will allow you to pay down your existing balance, not new charges, when you make payments on the card. It’s best to make a plan to pay down the full balance before the introductory period expires, as any remaining balance will be subject to the card’s regular APR after the introductory period. You should avoid missing payments, as doing so can trigger a penalty APR and loss of your zero percent introductory APR.


*The Annual Percentage Rate (APR) is the cost of credit as a yearly rate and ranges from 5.99%-29.99%, which may include an origination fee from 0.99% - 5.99%. Any origination fee on a 5-year loan will be at least 4.99% and is deducted from loan proceeds. The APR offered will depend on your credit score, income, debt payment obligations, loan amount, loan term, credit usage history and other factors, and therefore may be higher than our lowest advertised rate. Requests for the highest loan amount may resulting an APR higher than our lowest advertised rate. You need a minimum 700 FICO® score and a minimum individual annual income of $100,000 to qualify for our lowest rate.
In the spending bill passed by Congress in March 2018 to fund the government through September, Congress ignored many of the Trump administration’s budget proposals including doing away with the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program. Instead, Congress allocated $350 million for the Department of Education to help borrowers with previously unqualified repayment plans gain student loan forgiveness, and President Trump signed it into law. The purpose of the PSLF was to entice graduates to take qualified public service jobs that served the community and to enable forgiveness of all student loan debt for those borrowers after 120 payments over 10 years into an income-driven repayment plan. To normally be eligible for forgiveness under PSLF, you must be on an income-driven repayment plan. The $350 million is earmarked for those who meet all qualifications but were paying into a graduated or extended repayment plan, which are not normally eligible. However, $350 million is unlikely to cover all who apply. This new program is known as the Expanded Temporary Public Service Loan Forgiveness program.
If you’ve been looking at consolidating your debt, but you think there are some other great options available to you, you might be wondering what the best choice is. While there are plenty of ways you can reduce the amount of interest you’re currently paying, many of them come with downsides that are hard to foresee. Regardless, you might find that one of these options is more suited to you.
5. Make a plan to avoid new debt. A debt consolidation loan can wipe the slate clean and allow you to start fresh with zero balances on credit cards and other credit commitments. Although it may be tempting, avoid using your newly cleared accounts to shop or manage household expenses. You don’t want to create new debt that you’ll have to pay on top of your debt consolidation loan.
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You can take out a loan of up to $35,000 to consolidate your debt through BestEgg. That may sound like a good thing at first, but consider this: The company only offers you the choice of a three- or five-year term. If you take out a large amount of money, you’ll also need an equally high income to make those whopping payments. Instead, if you’re facing a large amount of debt, it’s worthwhile to also consider a lender that offers more options.
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You're also entitled to a free credit report if you've been turned down for credit because of something on your credit report, if you're currently receiving government assistance, if you're unemployed and plan to look for a job soon, or if you think you've been a victim of credit card fraud or identity theft. Some states even have laws that let you get an additional free credit report each year. All these free credit reports should be ordered directly through the credit bureaus.

Another potential issue with getting a debt consolidation loan with a "poor" credit score is that the interest rate on your new loan could, in some cases, be higher than the APR on your existing debt. Lenders often use your creditworthiness to establish what interest rate you get, so people with "poor" or even "fair" credit scores should be careful not take on new loans with higher rates.
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Interest savings: If you have multiple sources of debt with high annual percentage rates, you can save on total interest if you get a debt consolidation loan with a lower rate. For example, if you consolidate two credit card balances with APRs of 16.24 and 23.99 percent into a debt consolidation loan with a 15 percent APR, you will save on interest. “Rates can be considerably lower than credit card interest rates, so you’ll save money in interest fees,” says credit expert John Ulzheimer, formerly of Equifax and Experian. “Second, loans have a finite amortization period, generally not longer than a few years. You can’t say the same about credit cards.”
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