Advertiser Disclosure: The products that appear on this site may be from companies from which MagnifyMoney receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). MagnifyMoney does not include all financial institutions or all products offered available in the marketplace.
We work to remove the negative/inaccurate items on your credit report – such as collections, late payments, delinquent accounts (charge-offs), repossessions, bankruptcies, foreclosures, and inquiries. We do this by creating custom dispute letters with the credit bureaus (Experian, TransUnion, Equifax). More importantly – WJA sends customized audits to creditors backed by our in-house attorney.
Co-signers or joint applications are offered by some, but not all, debt consolidation lenders. Co-signers reduce the risk for lenders, as they are required to pay the loan if you don’t. With a co-signer option, you may be able to qualify for a loan that you wouldn’t be able to get on your own, potentially with better terms. However, if you default on a loan with a co-signer, you may damage their credit as well as your relationship.
Offered terms are subject to change. Loans are offered by CommonBond Lending, LLC (NMLS # 1175900). If you are approved for a loan, the interest rate offered will depend on your credit profile, your application, the loan term selected and will be within the ranges of rates shown. All Annual Percentage Rates (APRs) displayed assume borrowers enroll in auto pay and account for the 0.25% reduction in interest rate. All variable rates are based on 1-month LIBOR
This site does not negotiate, adjust or settle debts. All federal student borrowers are able and encouraged to apply for any federal repayment or forgiveness programs through the US Department of Education for free without paying fees to any entity. Nothing on this site constitutes official qualification or guarantee of result. StudentDebtRelief.us is a private company not affiliated with the Department of Education of the Federal Government.
You can get rid of credit card debt in several different ways. Debt consolidation loans are one way. You can also take out a home equity loan (or a cash-out refinance) from your mortgage lender, or you can open a new credit card and transfer the balances over. The latter might come with a zero percent introductory interest rate, giving you several months or more to pay down your balance interest-free.
If you plan to use a debt consolidation plan to address your outstanding debts, make sure that you don’t inadvertently damage your credit score in the process with simple mistakes. How you consolidate all your credit card debts can negatively affect your credit score. Borrowers often use balance transfers and move all of their credit card debt to a single card with a higher credit limit. However, in doing so, they may end up with a high credit utilization rate if they close the old accounts completely. For that reason, it makes sense to keep at least a few of the paid-off cards open, but be sure not to use them.
One of the main advantages of a debt consolidation loan is eliminating the task of paying multiple lenders each month. When you consolidate all your existing debt into one new loan, you only have to make payments to your new lender. Making only one payment is not only easier, but it can save you from dealing with late and missed payments—which can occur when juggling multiple different payments each month.
You should expect your credit score to be lower while you’re working to get out of debt; after all, important credit score factors such as your payment history and credit utilization are likely key reasons why you’re working to get out of debt in the first place. While you should be concerned about your credit score, and monitor it at all times, a lower credit score is not a reason to panic. Remember, you’re considering a debt consolidation plan to help you manage your debts more effectively, which should help your credit score in the end.
When the bureaus and data furnishers receive the dispute and supporting information, they will then work with the credit repair company to determine if the item should be removed from your credit report. The major law dictating your rights when it comes to credit reporting is the Fair Credit Reporting Act, but it isn’t the only law on your side when it comes to credit repair.

Additionally, the security deposit you use to obtain the card is used if you default on your payment. Using the security deposit means that, even if you default, the card is paid because it’s secured by your funds. As such, the account won’t in collections due to nonpayment. However, this isn’t the case if the balance on which you default is higher than the amount of your security deposit.


Payday loans. Payday loans are typically short-term loans for $500 or less due on your next payday. Payday loans usually have extremely high interest rates, often a $15 per $100 fee that equates to an APR of almost 400 percent. They are exceptionally risky, high-cost loans that typically have interest rates far higher than existing credit card debt and terms that are too short to help consolidate and pay off debt.

At LendingTree, you can make dozens of personal loan companies compete for your business with a single online form. When you fill out the form, LendingTree will do a soft pull – which means your score will not be negatively impacted. Dozens of lenders will compete and you may be matched with lenders who want your business. You may be able to compare and save in just a few minutes. We recommend starting here. You can always apply directly to other lenders – but many of the lenders we recommend already participate in the LendingTree personal loan online tool.


You've probably seen advertisements for credit repair on television or heard them on the radio. Maybe you've even seen credit repair signs on the side of the road. You don't have to hire a professional to fix your credit. The truth is, there is nothing a credit repair company can do to improve your credit that you can’t do for yourself. Save some money and the hassle of finding a reputable company and repair your credit yourself. The next steps will show you how.
A debt management plan is a formal plan to restructure and pay off your debt. A company will manage the plan and negotiate some cost reductions with your creditors, such as waived fees or a lower interest rate. You’ll make a single payment to the plan manager, who will distribute the funds to your creditors. While you’re in the program, you won’t be able to use your credit cards or open new ones. The plan is designed to get you out of debt in three to five years, after which all of your accounts should be reported as paid-as-agreed.
Step 1: Tell the credit reporting company, in writing, what information you think is inaccurate. Use our sample letter to help write your own. Include copies (NOT originals) of any documents that support your position. In addition to including your complete name and address, your letter should identify each item in your report that you dispute; state the facts and the reasons you dispute the information, and ask that it be removed or corrected. You may want to enclose a copy of your report, and circle the items in question. Send your letter by certified mail, “return receipt requested,” so you can document that the credit reporting company got it. Keep copies of your dispute letter and enclosures.
The repair companies' targeting of home loan applicants and refinancers came as no surprise to mortgage lenders like Joe Petrowsky, president of Right Trac Financial Group. in Manchester, Conn. "People see those cockamamie advertisements" saying they can wipe their credit problems away "and they get hooked," he said. "We run into the damage they do every week." Would-be homebuyers pay hundreds of dollars to credit repair companies to dispute debts in their credit reports only to discover that not only have their credit scores not increased but they can't qualify for a mortgage at all.
Once that is done, dispute letters have to be drafted and documentation needs to be gathered before you submit your disputes to the credit bureau(s). The time required for this step varies, depending on the nature of your disputes and how organized you’ve been about keeping financial records. This part of the process can take anywhere from a few hours if you’re organized to a few days if you need to hunt down statements and documentation that proves your case.
The idea behind the snowball method is that you would be able to get one of your credit cards paid off fairly quickly and would then have extra money available to begin paying off the credit card with the second lowest balance and so on. We’ve seen examples where people were able to pay off $20,000 in debts in just 27 months using this method. Dave calls it the snowball method because as you pay off each debt you gain momentum for paying off the next credit card debt much as a snowball gathers momentum as it rolls downhill. A similar debt payoff method is called the debt avalanche. Both plans try to accelerate paying off your debt. They both can work if you can stick with them and have the money needed to pay off your debt.
580 credit score581 credit score582 credit score583 credit score584 credit score585 credit score586 credit score587 credit score588 credit score589 credit score590 credit score591 credit score592 credit score593 credit score594 credit score595 credit score596 credit score597 credit score598 credit score599 credit score600 credit score601 credit score602 credit score603 credit score604 credit score605 credit score606 credit score607 credit score608 credit score609 credit score610 credit score611 credit score612 credit score613 credit score614 credit score615 credit score616 credit score617 credit score618 credit score619 credit score620 credit score621 credit score622 credit score623 credit score624 credit score625 credit score626 credit score627 credit score628 credit score629 credit score630 credit score631 credit score632 credit score633 credit score634 credit score635 credit score636 credit score637 credit score638 credit score639 credit score640 credit score641 credit score642 credit score643 credit score644 credit score645 credit score646 credit score647 credit score648 credit score649 credit score650 credit score651 credit score652 credit score653 credit score654 credit score655 credit score656 credit score657 credit score658 credit score659 credit score660 credit score661 credit score662 credit score663 credit score664 credit score665 credit score666 credit score667 credit score668 credit score669 credit score

If you have high-interest credit card balances on multiple accounts, just making those monthly payments can be so tough that you can’t afford the things you really need or want — much less save any money. It may also stress you out. In this situation, debt consolidation might be a smart decision. But before you get started, let’s dig in to understand how debt consolidation can affect your credit scores.


All children and young people should understand the importance of wellbeing and good mental health. They should develop the skills and resilience to keep well, and to understand the signs of being unwell and be confident to ask for help. They should expect that the support available in education, the community and the health and care systems meets their needs.
Making your credit payments on time is one of the biggest contributing factors to your credit scores. Some banks offer payment reminders through their online banking portals that can send you an email or text message reminding you when a payment is due. You could also consider enrolling in automatic payments through your credit card and loan providers to have payments automatically debited from your bank account, but this only makes the minimum payment on your credit cards and does not help instill a sense of money management.
Type of lending company. Debt consolidation loans are offered by private banks and peer-to-peer marketplace lenders. Traditional banks are typically more well-established but can have higher qualification requirements and costs. Often, traditional banks require a minimum FICO credit score of 600. Some have prepayment penalties and a 1 to 5 percent origination fee. It’s a good idea to look for lenders that offer no prepayment penalties or origination fees.
×