A debt management plan, or DMP, is offered by credit card debt consolidation companies. Often referred to as non-profit credit counseling. What happens in a DMP is your cards will all be closed. The company you choose to work with will negotiate your interest rate down and set up a repayment plan. They do this with all of your accounts. You will pay one fixed monthly payment to the consolidation company that is then dispersed to your creditors, minus their fees.

Many people, however, don’t have the time or don’t understand how to make their case, so they look into hiring a credit repair company to dispute errors on their behalf. These companies can charge a fee for their legwork (more on how that works in a minute), but there are times when the extra help can certainly be welcome. (Say you have multiple errors across credit reports or you’ve been the victim of widespread identity theft.)
Offered terms are subject to change. Loans are offered by CommonBond Lending, LLC (NMLS # 1175900). If you are approved for a loan, the interest rate offered will depend on your credit profile, your application, the loan term selected and will be within the ranges of rates shown. All Annual Percentage Rates (APRs) displayed assume borrowers enroll in auto pay and account for the 0.25% reduction in interest rate. All variable rates are based on 1-month LIBOR

If you are a careful money manager who fell into debt because of unusual circumstances (medical or veterinary  bill, loss of employment or some other emergency) and NOT because you spent more on your credit cards than you could afford to pay off each month, then leave the accounts open. Doing so will help your credit score, because the amount of revolving debt you have is a significant factor in your credit score. Just be sure to put the cards away. Don’t use them while you pay down your debt consolidation loan.


The American Opportunity Tax Credit has been improved by the Tax Cuts & Job Act.  This is one of the more popular deductions for student loans that allows up to a $2,500 deduction for qualified education expenses for the first 4 years of higher education. The IRS data show that 9m Americans applied for this tax credit last year.  The Tax Cuts & Jobs Act has increased the allowable deduction period to five years instead of four, but the fifth year is at a reduced $1,250 deduction.  The deduction is calculated as being 100% of the expenses incurred up to the first $2,000, and after that it’s 25% of the next $2,000 for a max of $2,500.
A lender’s maximum debt-to-income ratio is the amount of your monthly debt payments divided by your gross monthly income. Lenders use this figure to determine your ability to make loan payments each month. Some debt consolidation lenders allow a debt-to-income ratio as high as 50 percent, meaning your monthly debt obligations should add up to 50 percent or less of your gross monthly income. Others recommend little revolving credit.
Debt consolidation, under the right circumstances, for the right consumer, may be a good option. However, for those who are running consistently behind each month and damaged their credit, it most likely going to be a tough road to qualify. Many times, as mentioned, consumers just can’t seem to budget their money effectively to stretch their dollars to make ends meet. This can make debt consolidation a bad option for them.
Credit counselors may charge expensive fees, and some creditors may refuse to work with the debt management plan. It’s generally a good idea to avoid credit counseling companies. Although debt management plans can be helpful for some consumers, they shouldn’t be the first choice. Be wary of a credit counseling service that offers a debt management plan as your first option, especially if they haven’t completed a thorough review of your financial situation.

When you apply for and then obtain your debt consolidation loan, you may notice a slight drop in your credit score immediately afterward. Every time you apply for new credit, a lending institution pulls your credit report to help it decide whether to grant you a loan. New credit inquiries comprise approximately 10% of your credit report, and each new inquiry can potentially have a negative impact on your overall credit score.


StepChange Debt Charity (formerly the Consumer Credit Counselling Service (CCCS))[1] is the trading name of the Foundation for Credit Counselling, and is a debt charity operating across the United Kingdom. The organisation offers free debt advice and money management and can be contacted through its freephone telephone helpline[2] or online through StepChange Debt Remedy, its online debt advice tool.[3]. In 2017, around 620,000 people contacted the charity for help.[4] The charity also campaigns to change policies and practices that trap people in problem debt.

After getting a debt consolidation loan, 68 percent of respondents changed their spending habits for the better. More than 30 percent said they now pay bills on time, 22 percent monitor their credit reports and 13 percent stopped using consolidated accounts. However, not all respondents changed their habits for the better, with 10 percent reporting they accrued more debt, which is in line with the 9 percent who said they also accrued more debt when asked if the loan was a good choice. Seven percent maxed out credit lines and 7 percent made charges on consolidated accounts.
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